Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration

Aerobic Respiration

Aerobic Respiration is one of the two types of cellular respiration, other being the anaerobic respiration. The metabolic reactions in aerobic respiration take place in the presence of oxygen. In other words, the process of breaking down glucose in the presence of oxygen to produce energy is called aerobic respiration.

Aerobic Respiration Equation: C6H12O6 + 6O2 –> 6CO2 + 6H2O + 38ATP

Anaerobic Respiration

Anaerobic Respiration is one of the two types of cellular respiration, other being the aerobic respiration. It is the one where a metabolic reaction takes place without utilizing oxygen. In other words, the process of breaking down glucose in absence of oxygen to produce energy is called anaerobic respiration.

Aerobic Respiration Equation: C6H12O6 –> 2C2H5OH + 2CO2 + 2ATP

Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration

Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration
S. No. Basis of Difference Aerobic Respiration Anaerobic Respiration
1. Definition Aerobic Respiration is the cellular respiration that uses oxygen in the process. Anaerobic Respiration is the cellular respiration that happens without oxygen.
2. Type of Cell Aerobic respiration is a characteristic of eukaryotic cells when they have sufficient oxygen. Anaerobic respiration is used by certain prokaryotes including some species of archaea and bacteria.
3. Chemical Reaction During aerobic respiration, glucose reacts with oxygen and produces carbon dioxide, water, and energy. In the process of anaerobic respiration, glucose gives out lactic acid and energy.
4. Location Aerobic respiration, after glycolysis, takes place in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells. Anaerobic respiration takes place only in the cytoplasm of a cell.
5. Production of Energy A high volume of energy is produced in aerobic respiration. Lesser energy is produced during anaerobic respiration.
6. Numbers of ATP released The oxidation of one molecule of glucose during aerobic respiration produces 38 ATP molecules. The number of ATP molecules produced during anaerobic respiration is merely two.
7. Final Product The final product of aerobic respiration is carbon dioxide, water, and energy. The final product of anaerobic respiration is the lactic acid in animal cells and carbon dioxide and ethanol in the plant cell. In short, it produces acids, alcohols, gases, and energy.
8. Time taken in the process Aerobic respiration is a time taking process. Anaerobic respiration is a comparatively faster process as compared to aerobic respiration.
9. Exchange of Gases The exchange of oxygen takes place during aerobic respiration. Oxygen is observed and carbon dioxide is released. No exchange of gases takes place during anaerobic respiration. However, some organisms release gases like sulfur and nitrogen.
10. Prerequisites Carbohydrates and oxygen are the prerequisites of aerobic respiration. The prerequisites of anaerobic respiration include carbohydrates along with some electron acceptors like sulfur and nitrogen.
11. Oxidation Complete oxidation of carbohydrates occurs during the process of aerobic respiration. During anaerobic respiration, only partial or incomplete oxidation of carbohydrates takes place.
12. Occurs in Aerobic respiration occurs in most of the higher organisms like plants and animals. Anaerobic respiration occurs in primitive prokaryotes. It may also sometimes take place in higher organisms like in the muscle cells of human beings during extreme movements.
Citation
Use the citation below to add this article to your bibliography
Styles:

"Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration." Dashamlav.com. Web. 24 January 2022. <https://dashamlav.com/aerobic-respiration-vs-anaerobic-respiration/>

Dashamlav.com, "Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration." Accessed 24 January 2022. https://dashamlav.com/aerobic-respiration-vs-anaerobic-respiration/

"Aerobic Respiration vs. Anaerobic Respiration." (n.d.). Dashamlav.com. Retrieved 24 January 2022 from https://dashamlav.com/aerobic-respiration-vs-anaerobic-respiration/